Supplementary Material for: Hematuria Alone or in Combination with Proteinuria Is a Harbinger of Poor Prognosis in Patients with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Background: Screening for hematuria is essential during health checkups in the general population. However, urine examinations in patients with cancer tend to be overlooked. This study attempted to demonstrate the novel utility of urinalysis in the assessment of the prognosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Methods: A longitudinal, retrospective cohort study was conducted to examine the association between hematuria and mortality in 294 patients with NHL. Urinalysis was performed using a dipstick test. A multivariate, logistic regression model was constructed to evaluate factors associated with the presence of hematuria. Statistical association between hematuria and the time to all-cause mortality was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis, followed by multivariate proportional hazards regression analysis adjusted for covariates that might be related to mortality. Results: The prevalence of hematuria alone and in combination with proteinuria was 11.6 and 5.1%, respectively. C-reactive protein was a significant factor associated with the presence of hematuria (OR [95% CI] 1.17 [1.03–1.34], p = 0.0194). The cumulative mortality was significantly higher in patients with hematuria alone (51.1%), proteinuria alone (47.1%), and both (66.7%), than in those with neither (24.3%). Moreover, the presence of hematuria alone was significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% CI] 1.78 [1.10–3.50], p = 0.0455), and patients with concomitant proteinuria were at the highest risk (4.01 [1.71–8.33], p = 0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with hematuric NHL, systemic inflammation is likely to develop to such a great extent that kidney damage occurs. Therefore, the presence of hematuria, alone or especially in combination with proteinuria, predicts a poor prognosis of NHL.