516343_sm1.docx (49.74 kB)
Download file

Supplementary Material for: Stroke and Heart Attack Symptom Recognition in Older US Adults by Cognitive Impairment Status

Download (49.74 kB)
dataset
posted on 19.05.2021, 09:33 by Tran P., Tran L.
Introduction: Cognitive impairment may make stroke and heart attack symptom recognition difficult, potentially resulting in treatment delays for those with these cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Despite cognitive impairment affecting large numbers of older US adults who are also at increased risk of stroke and heart attack, little is known about stroke and heart attack symptom recognition in this population. As a result, this study sought to determine the impact of cognitive impairment on stroke and heart attack symptom recognition among older US adults. Methods: Using the 2014 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys, we compared stroke and heart attack symptom recognition levels in US adults aged ≥65 years with cognitive impairment and those without cognitive impairment. Estimates of stroke and heart attack symptom recognition adjusted for CVD-related factors were assessed by cognitive impairment status. We also conducted analyses stratified by living arrangement and stroke and heart attack history for individuals with and without cognitive impairment. Results: US adults aged ≥65 years with cognitive impairment were observed to be 3.0–6.7% and 1.6–4.9%, respectively, less likely to recognize an individual stroke and heart attack symptom than similarly aged individuals without cognitive impairment. Recognition of all 5 stroke/heart attack symptoms was also lower among those with cognitive impairment, with this group being 9.7% less likely to recognize all stroke symptoms and 6.7% less likely to recognize all 5 heart attack symptoms compared to people without cognitive impairment. Following adjustment, individuals with cognitive impairment continued to have slightly lower recognition of certain individual stroke and heart attack symptoms as well as of all 5 symptoms of these conditions (stroke OR: 0.70 [95% CI: 0.58–0.85]; heart attack OR: 0.88 [95% CI: 0.75, 1.03]) than those without cognitive impairment. For individuals with cognitive impairment, living with others was linked with slightly better recognition of all individual stroke symptoms and heart attack history with better recognition of all individual heart attack symptoms. Conclusions: Additional work is needed to address the challenge of improving recognition levels for specific stroke and heart attack symptoms in older US adults with cognitive impairment and especially for members of this group who live alone.

History